Author Interview: Val Rainey

One look at Val Rainey’s website, and you’ll be in love!  It’s a treasure trove of beautiful illustrations and fun.  Val and I spent a little time talking about her children’s book, Sunny’s Grand Adventure.

What was your inspiration for writing Sunny’s Grand Adventure?

Well, it was a daisy pin that belonged to my mother Betty. Sunny began as a six-page double spaced hand written piece of silly and grew into a story/colouring book.

She is limited to a print run of 1000 copies and naturally I sign them all.

Part of her earnings is donated to children’s charities.

Do you have children in your own family who enjoy your books?

Yes. I gave my brother and my nieces and nephews their own copies for Christmas 2004.

Since then Sunny has been doing a lot of flying. Some of her adventures have taken her to Australia, Germany, New Zealand and of course Canada and the U.S.

Your website, The Elf and Toadstool, is a wonderful place full of whimsy and fantasy.  Have you always been interested in fantasy?

I guess so. I always loved the faerie tales that I was read and learned how to read on my own.

What’s your writing process like?

Oh, now there’s a dangerous question! The adventure begins when a character comes to visit the way Sunny and Marigold both did. From there it can get pretty crazy with everyone telling me how the story actually happened. Yes. Past tense.  I end up being an overworked recording secretary as much as the author.

Marigold is a series that I am working on. Marigold is a dragon. She is definitely not your regular dragon…oh no…not her.

Did you have a hand in choosing or creating the illustrations?

You want to believe it. I have a lovely lady Emily J. Hercock who lives in the U.K. I let her know what I want and voila.

What is your favorite children’s book?

It is a series of books that has been around a very long time. It is called simply My Bookhouse. The early illustrations were absolutely scrumptious. They were done in plates. The set I had was printed in the fifties. The series started with easy poems like the Little Red Hen and went all the way through to Shakespeare. I sure wish that I still had it.

Do you have more children’s books planned for the future?

Always! One series that I’m busy working on is called The Sunshine Collection. The first book, Fun and Frolic, is a collection of stories and poems written by my mother and I over a 75 year period. I never knew that she wrote until a box arrived from one of her sisters in 2000 with her work and other family treasures.

I’m busy with Down on the Farm and plan have it out for Christmas. The lovely Emily Hercock is doing the illustrations and cover for it.

Oh! I almost forgot……. I will also have a special poem about Max the Christmas Mouse available then too.

 

You can find Sunny’s Grand Adventure and Fun and Frolic at The Elf and Toadstool under the Book Nook tab.  Also, check out the Facebook page for The Elf and Toadstool.

 

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Author Interview: Harriet Hunter

While many books are written purely to entertain, Harriet Hunter seeks to help those dealing with alcoholism.  Since she has been through it herself, she is able to provide an insider’s perspective for those looking to walk a higher path.  Miracles of Recovery is due out later this year, but her website provides a lot of valuable information.

Since Miracles of Recovery was an outgrowth of your own experience with addiction and recovery, was it difficult for you to write?

No, quite the contrary. I’ve been writing (journaling) for years and writing each morning was natural, as a way to focus on one thought or a specific emotion.

The idea for Miracles of Recovery came to light after the death of my only child four years ago while overwhelmed with emotions. I realized I was already writing what I knew about, so for the first year, I never had to think about what I was going to write. Spiritual and emotional reflections were right before my eyes. It was after that first year I said to myself, “You realize you have a daily reader here, don’t you?”

It’s obvious that you’ve put a lot of work and caring into your website and blog as a service for those who are seeking help.  How do you find time for it all?

I try to wake up before my two dogs, a golden retriever and an American bulldog, and I am driven. Losing a child, a husband and two brothers, three in the last four years, has a way of propelling me to “see each day as if it is my last.” I write as if squeezing as many hours most days as possible.

My dogs demand a lot of physical attention and in between, I have my home I care for, volunteer work, and outings with friends. And of course, my critique groups!  Between these, including articles for submission, I try to write and edit at least five hours a day, but even this is not nearly enough.

Is there any one thing that you feel can help people most when they’re struggling with addiction?

The desire to change is an individual need that must come from the user, and no one else. Other than sharing with them what was so freely given to me, the responsibility for anyone who wants sobriety rests with the individual.  If new to recovery, we can help to allay fears and provide insightful information and literature.  This is a program of attraction, not promotion. Short of prayer, emotional support and encouragement while providing information about the AA program is about all we can do. We know manipulating, begging, jail, and loss of home and family isn’t enough at times to stop this terrible disease that demands it have all of us.  Jails, institutions, and death are a typical outcome for those with addictions. Any life-altering requires dedication from the individual to go the distance. They have to want change above everything else.

Recovery allows those who care to, to share with others our experience, strength, and hope so they may identify and see they too, can have hope to maintain sobriety one day at a time. Miracles of change that have happened to me and millions of others occur every day in our meetings of recovery. Those returning to the program already know what to expect and find it easier, sometimes, than the newcomer to come back.

I have always believed information is power. My book, focused on the newcomer and relapse, is a holistic attempt to provide reminders and an “inside look” at what they can expect coming into Alcoholics Anonymous. It takes a small mustard seed of willingness to walk into the rooms, which is often the most difficult thing to do of all. The AA program of recovery, as with any 12-step program, is a one-day-at-a-time commitment to not drink.

When can we expect Miracles of Recovery to be released?

I hope to be ready before the close of 2018, the very latest.

What are your favorite books?

The Outlander series, Gone with the Wind, Prince of Tides and many others.

What’s your favorite time of day?

Early morning before the angels fly and my dogs awake!

Do you have other books in the works?

Yes, I’ve been preparing a sequel to Miracles of Recovery, which will focus on recovery as being a program of action, with exercises, tables and personal accounts from others on each of the 12-Steps as to how the program has changed their lives.

We know normal people never have to think they may have a problem with alcohol. If they wonder, then chances are good that they do. Please visit http://www.aa.org/ for more information, telephone numbers and meeting schedules in your area.

 

Harriet Hunter lives in Florida with her dogs and when she’s not writing, she can most often be found outdoors gardening, walking or helping others. Visit her at Harriethunter.org or on Facebook. You can also follow her on Twitter @Elizza6. For personal questions or information, contact her at Harriet@harriethunter.org.

 

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Author Interview: Elle Spellman

Elle Spellman draws inspiration from her love of comics to create stories about the heroines we all want to be.  She found time in her busy schedule to tell me a little more about herself and her work.

If you could have just one superpower, what would it be?

Hmm, there are so many possibilities! Being a comic fan, it’s a question I’ve always pondered. I guess it would all depend what would happen to me to get my power! Personally I’d love super strength like She-Hulk (she’s one of my favourite characters!), or sentient hair like Medusa from Marvel’s Inhumans series. But in reality I’d have to be sensible and would probably take teleportation, to get more time in the day!

I see that you like comic books; do you have a favorite?

I like so many! But I’m a huge Batman fan and my favourite is probably Batman: Year One.

 What do you do when you aren’t writing?

When I’m not writing, I’m reading! I run a book blog about women’s fiction called Super Heroines, so I’m always on the lookout for new books to feature and review. Aside from my bookish and nerdy interests, I also love running and keeping fit. I have a full-time job, too. My life is a busy one, but I enjoy every minute of it.

 Favorite breakfast food?

That’s tricky! I tend to have porridge with blueberries most days, or pancakes with fruit. But let’s face it, who doesn’t love a huge bowl of chocolate-covered cereal now and again?

Tea or coffee?

I love coffee, but I’m more partial to tea. I drink a coffee each morning and tea during the day! I also have a chamomile tea at night.

 Who are your greatest influences that you know in real life?

Being a book blogger, I have been lucky enough to meet so many talented authors that have influenced me, but my greatest influences are my mother and grandmother. They always encouraged me to read and write from a very young age, helped me with my stories, and encouraged me to send my work to publishers. Sadly my grandmother passed away when I was younger, but she will always be a huge inspiration to me.

Do you participate in NaNoWriMo?  Why or why not?

I do indeed! I love NaNoWriMo, maybe because I’m quite deadline-driven, so I like having that end goal in sight. There’s a great feeling of achievement once you hit that magical 50k, but I always know that even if I don’t get there, just half of that target is something to be proud of. Plus, with so many people across the globe taking part, there’s a great sense of community that can keep you inspired. I’ve completed NaNoWriMo for the past three years and hope to again this year (I tend to take a week of holiday in November to lock myself away and write!)

Bookstore or library?

I always find myself wandering into bookstores when I’m in town, just looking at all the new novels and the beautiful covers, trying to refrain from buying them all! Books are my weakness. That said, Bristol has a fantastic central library in a beautiful old building which I really should go and visit more often.

Where’s your favorite place to write?  What’s your writing process like?

Honestly? I write anywhere. At home, in coffee shops, in notebooks at work on my lunch break or on the train home. Ideas tend to pop into my head at the strangest moments so I always keep a notepad and pen handy! I tend to work best when I have a short time frame, such as an hour before the working day begins, or some time before bed. I don’t have a specific schedule, and kind of envy writers who can set one and stick to it! (Tips greatly appreciated! Hehe.)

Tell us a little bit about book #2!

I can’t really say much about it just yet, but it’s a completely new novel. It’s contemporary fiction with magical realism; light-hearted but at the same time rather dark, so quite a bit different from She’s Bad News.

Elle can be found on Twitter at @capesandcorsets.  She also maintains a personal blog and a book blog.  Check out She’s Bad News on Amazon UK, Amazon US, and Goodreads.  Read more about the book below:

SHE’S BAD NEWS

By Elle Spellman

What would you do if you woke up with super powers?

For Bella Brown, life hasn’t gone according to plan. She’s almost thirty, still living in her uneventful hometown, and her dreams of becoming an investigative reporter have fallen by the wayside.

 

 That is, until she wakes up one morning to find she’s been gifted with some amazing new abilities. What’s a girl to do with heightened senses, super speed and the ability to lift a truck one-handed? Bella quickly discovers that her new powers can easily help her land front-page leads at local newspaper, The Hartleybourne Gazette. 

 Soon Bella’s out every night chasing down local criminals for stories, while keeping her powers a secret from everyone besides flatmate Chloe. But when a burglary-gone-wrong accidentally turns her into the mysterious Hartleybourne Heroine, Bella finds herself on the front page for the wrong reasons. Her secret becomes harder to keep as she tries to track down the source of her powers, and especially when crime reporter Matt Gilmore is intent on unmasking the town’s new vigilante…

 Suddenly, having an extraordinary life is far more dangerous than she ever imagined.

 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

 Elle Spellman is a writer and comic book geek living in the South West of England. She’s been writing since a very young age, spending her childhood afternoons penning stories about fictional adventures, and illustrating them too.

 

 

 

 

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Surviving Co-Authorship: Guest Post by Jennifer Pallanich

By Jennifer Pallanich

 

Co-writing a novel can be the best idea you’ve ever had. Or it can be a miserable experience that causes you to swear off co-authorship for the rest of your life.

Think back to those group projects in school. Sometimes the group was a dream team, and everyone contributed well and evenly, creating something that was far better than any one person could have done solo. The project was fun and you got an A. This is what you want.

But more often than not, one or two people did all the work while the rest contributed some or none at all. The keeners felt taken advantage of and the others felt nagged by the barrage of requests to participate. Not fun for anyone.

I hated group projects.

But I love co-writing: the collaborative process, working with someone I trust completely, each bringing our own writing strengths to the table.

What’s at the core of our co-author relationship? My brother and I make a good team. There’s the trust I mentioned, developed from earliest childhood and our shared upbringing. We have similar tastes in reading, culture and entertainment. We share many of the same interests and outlooks. We have similar work ethic and drive. We share certain writing ambitions and have a shared vision for what we want to accomplish.

We started our co-author lives with a deck stacked deeply in our favor.

But there are three more essential elements that make our collaboration enjoyable: artistic chemistry, mutual respect, and clearly defined expectations.

Artistic chemistry means bringing out the best in the other person’s writing and thinking. We spend countless hours kicking around ideas and brainstorming to work through knotty plot problems together. His ideas spur mine, and mine spur his. The artistic chemistry that is evident when we brainstorm makes me happy. It makes all the hard hours in front of the laptop fun.

Mutual respect is huge, and is borne of the trust we share. We treat each other well. We know the other person’s strengths and weaknesses as well as we know our own. We can see the other grow and improve in the craft of writing. We listen to the other’s opinions and respond respectfully, even when we disagree or just don’t like a suggestion. In the end, we make choices based on what’s best for the story we’re trying to tell, not based on whose idea it was or who just gave up and gave in because they just wanted the discussion to be over. To us, the story is bigger than the ego.

Probably the most important thing my brother and I did when we decided to create a superhero universe and co-write and co-publish a trilogy is draft a set of responsibilities and expectations. Our co-author agreement stipulates who has final say over story points and who has final say over the words. It outlines who handles which marketing actions. It states who works with the editors and who works with the artists. These roles are obviously in line with our strengths. I wouldn’t ever dream of collaborating with someone without clearly setting out the expectations of each party.

So, for example, if one of us believes the story should go one way, and the other thinks it should go the other, we’d both make our cases. Through the discussion – which often will include the question “what’s best for the story?” – one or the other of us might be swayed, and the discussion ends. But sometimes the person in charge of story makes a ruling. Once that’s done, the discussion is over and we move on, no ego involved.

Don’t make the mistake of thinking that co-authoring is less work or somehow easier than doing your own thing. Collaborating makes far more work, although I think the final product is worth it.

We’re both plotters rather than pantsers, so while we share the same writing approach we must harmonize two different writing styles. To address this, he revises the chapters I write and I revise the chapters he writes. This approach helps blend our styles and ensures every chapter shines with both of our voices.

Right now, my brother and I are in the final throes of revising the fourth draft of our second book to send to our editor at the end of January. It’s pretty intense, with each of us spending two or three hours a day on the project. Some of that is solo work – laptop hours editing and revising. But we spend a lot of time discussing the draft and fixing loose ends and broken logic.

The process isn’t perfect, and we’ve fine-tuned it a bit since we starting writing the first draft of the first book, but it works for us.

Happy writing.

 

Jennifer Pallanich is a freelance writer. As a trade journalist, she has bylined over half a million words about the oil and gas industry. She and her brother, Baltimore Russell, created the Children of the Solstice universe and between October 2014 and January 2015, they co-wrote the first draft of the entire trilogy. They co-published book one, Awakening, in late 2016 through their publishing imprint Pair Tree Ink. The second book is expected out in mid-2018. Jennifer loves to read good versus evil stories. An avid scuba diver, traveler, reader, and writer, she lives with a lab mix named Houdini and a cat named Possum. She volunteers with a local no-kill animal shelter.  Check out her Amazon page.

Baltimore Russsell is an actor, producer, and writer.  He and his husband created the People You Know new media series, which aired on HereTV.  Almost from the time he learned to work a pencil, he could often be found creating his own stories.  He lives in New York City with his husband, John Dylan Delatorre.  Check out his Amazon page.

 

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Author Interview: S. J. Brown

Spending time out in the wilderness with animals has been inspiring for S. J. Brown, who combines her love of writing and photography to create books that educate and entertain.  I got the chance to ask her a little bit about herself and her work.

Do you remember the first thing you wrote?

No, I don’t remember. I am sure it was in high school that is when a teacher encouraged me to explore the possibly of pursuing a career as a writer.  My first published piece took 10 minutes to write.  It was about clipping coupons.

What was one of your most memorable encounters when photographing wildlife?

There are many; my most memorable encounters are the ones that last a little longer and get me just a little closer to my subject.

Some, like the alligator in Florida and the Puffins on their own little island, I covered in my book Close Ups & Close Encounters.  Others, like the coyote in South Dakota and the bear in North Carolina, I have documented on film and may include in another book in the future.

With all of the work you do with nature (tagging butterflies, planting trees, recycling, growing your own veggies, etc.) it’s clear that you care about the environment.  What do you feel is one of the most important things people can do to help the Earth?

Educate themselves.  There are so many things each of us can do: recycling, planting, conserving energy, buying local. The list goes on and on.  It’s really not difficult to find ways to lesson our impact on the natural world. The important thing is that each of us do something.  Our children and grandchildren will be inheriting the earth.

Do you consider yourself more of a writer or more of a photographer?

It depends on what day it is.  Some days I spend the entire day in the field with the critters.  Some days I never leave my office because I am busy working on a manuscript, an article, or blog.  Photography gives me a chance to get close to wild critters.  Writing allows me the opportunity to share those experiences and my love of the natural world.

Your website mentions that you prefer to use film instead of digital imagery.  How do you feel the technological advances in photography have affected the art form?

Technology makes me wonder when I am looking at an image.  Did the photographer actually get that shot or was it enhanced and created on the computer?  A digital image is called a print; a photograph is captured on film.  To me there is a difference between a photograph and a print, and I prefer photographs.   The best way I can explain the difference is if you have two painters, and one uses oils and the other watercolors.  It is a preference.  Each is a different medium.

What are you reading right now?

I just finished reading A House Divided Against Itself by Bob O’Conner.  I like reading books by authors I have met, regardless of the genre.  So I have read sci-fi, horror, memoirs, westerns, historical, true crime, fiction and non-fiction.

Are there any future books in the works?

Yes.  My sister and I are putting the finishing touches on our manuscript Suburban Sisters.   I also am playing with the idea of doing another children’s picture book and revisiting a manuscript from the past that hasn’t been published yet.

Each Sunday I share an image on my Facebook page. Those on my  email list hear accounts of my recent adventures in the field.    They are the first to know when I will be signing books, or releasing a new book.  I am part of a blogging group and I share my blog posts on Authors Den.

Susan’s website can be found here, and you can also reach her on LinkedIn.

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Author Interview: Monroe Todd

Where do you find your inspiration for your stories?

I find inspiration in other stories, across all media. I used to write fanfiction as my start and AUs (alternate universes) were a big thing. What if the Avengers all lived in an apartment complex together, and all of their issues played out there? I watch movies and wonder what would have happened if Rose had scooched over and let the boy get on the door. I may not write that story, but it will spark another idea, perhaps about a couple abandoning a space shuttle but the escape pods are only meant for one of them.

I get ideas from books, like Megan Whalen Turner or Dianna Wynn Jones and Neil Gaiman. Stories spark more stories.

Tell me more about the book you have planned for release next year.

Which one? I actively go between two or five stories to work on. Does this take me longer to finish a book? Yes, yes, it does. Is this multitasking style the best way to write a book? Probably not, but it’s what I do, and I haven’t been able to break myself of the habit.

Out of all the ones I’m working on, I want The Howling Waste (working title) to be the one published in 2018 – of course I would love to get them all out and done this year too!

Can you share an excerpt with us?

Love to.

Topher walked into the study and collapsed into one of the overstuffed chairs. He clutched at his shirt and forced himself to take deep, even breaths.

“Elmore, come out of that bowl and stand like a man,” he said.

The toad croaked and hopped up on its hind legs, its forelegs on the glass. With a powerful leap, he cleared the rim of the glass bowl. At the arc of his jump, his limbs stretched like puddy and his torso broadened and his head grew like child’s balloon all at once.

The toad stood upright as a man, in form and mostly manner. He still possessed a hint of green to his clammy skin, and a wide gaze. It was rather difficult to tell whether the toad was a man or the man was a toad. Elmore Clark cleared his throat as was his habit and shook his head, as if clearing water from his ears.

“You sounded like a loon,” Clark said.

“Better than sounding like a suspect and having him seriously question me,” Topher said. “Houghton, get in here!” he shouted again.

“Are you sure he’s gone?” Jessop Houghton asked. The dark young man slipped into the room, glancing around as if he expected the inspector to descend from the ceiling and seize them all.

“I put the wards back in place,” Topher said. “We’ll have a fair warning if he arrives.”

“I don’t know if my nerves could take that,” Houghton said.

“Your nerves? I’m the one who had to distract him long enough for you two to put everything away. He knows my bloody name now!”

Houghton winced. He sat on the edge of a chair then was immediately up again. “Do you really think they can smell lies?”

“Taste, hear, smell, whichever. Do you really think I wanted to test him?”

“I think,” Clark said in a reedy voice, “We need a plan for when he does come back, and the good mistress still isn’t back. Lady Reginald has left us in an awkward position.”

“Of course she’s coming back,” Houghton said.

Clark made a derisive noise. Houghton looked to Topher for reassurance, but Topher dropped his gaze.

“How could you think that?” Houghton asked. “She wouldn’t simply abandon us.”

“Perhaps not,” Topher said. “But perhaps she can’t come back now.”

“Of course. She would only be gone so long if something were wrong. We have to help her.”

Houghton nodded and paced the room. Topher watched him and Elmore from where he lounged in the chair, one leg thrown over the arm. He’d only sit like that if he were certain Lady Reginald was very far away, and not near enough to box his ears. Still, he glanced over his shoulder from force of habit.

What do you do when you aren’t writing?

Recently, I’ve been binge-watching Miss Fisher’s Murder Mysteries and Doc Martin on Netflix. Or trying to. The episodes are very long, but I love it so it’s fine. I am also spending a lot more time planning using traveler’s notebooks. If you don’t know what those are, look up Chic Sparrow or Ali Brown on Youtube.

Fair warning: they’re addictive.

What’s your favorite book?

The Thief by Megan Whalen Turner. I have to say this not just because I adore that book and Gen, but also because after I read that book, I determined that I would be an author.

Favorite authors?

Megan Whalen Turner, Ted Dekker, Dianna Wynn Jones, and Neil Gaiman.

Where’s your favorite place to write?  What’s your writing process like?

I prefer writing at home, in my bedroom, at my desk or on my bed with the door closed and earphones in. however, my personal laptop does not function properly, and my writing process now is using my computer at work in between customers and hovering bosses. So that’s lovely.

Real books or e-readers?

Physical paper in hand books, please. I will read e-books on my phone or tablet but I don’t own an e-reader.

How long have you been writing?

I’m not sure, what year is it? Eight years, I think. I didn’t start writing stories outside of school until 2010. Yes, the match checks out.

Do you have any other books in the works?

Yes, about twenty. No, I’m working on twenty at the same time, but when I get one idea, that usually sparks three more. They’re all fantasy and sci-fi. One book is a short of fantasy retellings, then there’s the YA space opera series, a series of epic fantasy loosely based off of Rumpelstiltskin – and I mean, very loose — another series is a weird western with angels, dragons, shapeshifters, and a witch. Oh, and the Greek inspired portal fantasy. I told you, stories spark stories.

Where can we find your book?

It’s not ready yet! But once it is, you can find it exclusively on Amazon in e-book or paperback. Maybe audiobook too, down the line.

How can everyone reach you? (Facebook, Twitter, blog, etc.)

You can reach me on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and my website. I’m not quite everywhere.

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Author Interview: Patricia Dimsdale

How has your work as a teacher influenced your writing?

My career as a teacher has influenced me, but not the teaching aspect.  For over 30 years, I have worked with First Nations children and youth in six areas of British Columbia. Their culture has impressed me with how the people have used their natural surroundings to survive.

The first book I wrote was a graphic novel which included native culture, and many of the characters were based on people I knew. They gave their consent to be a character.

From your books, it seems that you’re very close to nature.  Have you always been that way?

Since I grew up on a remote farm, I have always been close to nature. Many of the places I worked in BC were very remote, some fly-in only. I have seen some of the most beautiful  mountain scenery in BC. Working in Pacific Ocean communities has been great, with awe inspiring waves, rocky shores, and pebble beaches. In the Cassiar mountains of the north, I hiked to the top of mountains where I sketched wild flowers and mountain sheep.

What’s your favorite book?

I don’t have a favorite book, but do have a favorite author, Jodi Thomas. She writes contemporary western romance. I like her so much that I asked her to be a character, the lady pastor, in my graphic novel. She said yes!

Where’s your favorite place to write?  What’s your writing process like?

My favorite place to write used to be on top of mountains, where I wrote poetry. Now that I live in Alberta, I write in an easy chair in my living room.

The writing process starts with a concept that I mind-map around. When something grabs me or jolts my attention, I focus on that. Then I play the main scenes out like a movie in my mind. I am visually oriented, being first an artist, so I have to see all the scenes in my head before I can write them.

Then I plot out the major scenes in a circle, with connecting lines between them, showing how each character affects others. This is the left brain work. Then I start writing directly on the computer.  I make written notes to remind me of things I want to add, and personal drama between characters.

The scenes can change, and new ideas come up, and even new characters walk in. These I jot down before forgetting them.

Real books or e-readers?

I only do real hard copy books, though I tried to add my books to Kindle, but that did not work.

How long have you been writing?

I have been writing for a long time. Initially, I wrote poetry, and some of it was published. Then I took a college fiction writing course from a lady who was a successful young adult writer. She was good at inspiring us to write short stories. Another distance ed course in fiction writing also helped. The main text was Fiction Writers Workshop, which I recommend to everyone.

Do you have any other books in the works?

The book I am working on now is tentatively titled Mountains Where You Can Ride Horses. An accounting clerk quits her job, learns carpentry, and seeks to build a cabin by herself in the BC wilderness.

Be sure to check out Patricia’s books, Rough Inlet, Fissure in the Rock.  You can find her on Facebook.

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