Category Archives: science fiction

Starlog 4: Star Trek Canon

Check out this post if you haven’t read about my Star Trek course I’m taking yet!

In the current unit, I’ve been asked: In your opinion, what are the benefits of adhering to canon? What creative potential exists in jumping off from it? Where has Star Trek (or other similar franchises) done it well or poorly?

Personally, I think adhering to canon is a wonderful thing. Fans like to feel like authorities on their favorite show, and being familiar with the various rules of a given fictional world allow them to do that. The “rules” that canon sets forth also serve to make the franchise feel more real and allows fans to take it more seriously.

As a writer, I can also see a great benefit for those who create new episodes and movies. Canon gives them a place to start from, a world they can dive into where histories and characters are already established. I know from my personal experience that when it comes to writing a series, it’s much harder to write the first story than it is the fifth. Canon also creates a challenge for writers to find new spaces within that megatext to create stories.

I think Star Trek has done a wonderful job with this. Yes, there are some things that can be debated, such as the changing appearance of the Klingons throughout the different series, but that’s also part of the fun. Some of the time gaps that hadn’t previously been addressed before have a matrix laid down by that previous canon for the writers to bounce off of and explore. The trekkies flocking to conventions (when we’re not living in a pandemic, of course) are doing it because they take the show seriously and want to know more. They’ve become attached to these characters and this universe, and there’s no greater proof than that.

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Ashley O’Melia is an independent author and freelancer from Southern Illinois.  She holds her Bachelor’s Degree in Creative Writing and English from Southern New Hampshire University.  Her books include The Wanderer’s Guide to Dragon Keepingand The Graveside Detective.  Her short stories have been published in The Penmen Review, Siren’s Call, and Subcutaneous.  Ashley’s freelance work has spanned numerous genres for clients around the world.  You can find her on Facebook and Amazon.

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Starlog 3: Star Trek and Societal Issues

If you haven’t already read my other posts, I’m currently taking a course on Star Trek and it’s cultural impact. Is that geeky? Sure, but so am I.

The most current question that’s been posed in this class is: Which pilot best addresses the contemporary societal issues from when it was produced while taking the most advantage of the television format on which it was shown? Rank the episodes you watch in numerical order where 1 is the episode that best answers the question prompt.

If you watch any episode of Star Trek, from any series, you’ll be almost guaranteed to find some sort of remark about societal issues. The specific pilot episodes that were part of this assignment all speak about what it is to be human and how we treat both other humans and other species.

#6 – Star Trek Enterprise: “Broken Bow” – I personally love Enterprise, even though I know a lot of Trekkies don’t. I’ve got to put it at the bottom, however, because I think this was more about nostalgia and finding a way to keep the franchise going by looking back than about any societal commentary.

#5 – Star Trek Voyager: “Caretaker” – While overall I ended up loving this series, I thought the pilot was pretty boring. It could be said that the issues the Federation and the Cardassians have with the Maquis are a commentary on the various wars that were still happening overseas in 1995. In that year, the telescopes in the Keck Observatory spotted the most distant galaxy yet found at that point, at 15 billion miles away. Could that have been inspiration for a ship being flung to the furthest, unknown reaches of the galaxy? I think so.

#4 – Star Trek Discovery: “The Vulcan Hello” – While I don’t feel this pilot did much to comment on current societal issues, I do think it served to take advantage of its television format. This speaks to the entire series, considering its only available through a paid streaming format. The producers took this change to make a Trek series that is rated TV-14 or TV-MA (depending on the episode). It’s a show that’s more adult-oriented instead of the other family-aligned series, which gives it the chance to pull in entirely new fans.

#3 – Star Trek Deep Space Nine: “Emissary” – It seems to me that the newly freed planet of Bajor–which Benjamin Sisko is charged with bringing into the Federation “at all costs” while serving on the nearby space station–could represent the constantly changing issues in the Middle East in the early nineties.

#2 – Star Trek The Original Series: “The Cage” – This wasn’t an episode I’d watched before, so I pulled it up on Netflix. It’s got the family-oriented format that network television (particularly back in the 60’s) demanded. It’s the original pilot of the series, and it features Captain Pike instead of James T. Kirk. The episode comments on women in a position of power when Pike says, “I just can’t get used to having a woman on the bridge.” The crew lands on a planet that had been left unable to sustain life on the surface after thousands of years of war, which could certainly point to an anti-war message in the era of Vietnam. Another anti-war message I spotted was the fact that the aliens were essentially putting Pike and another woman in a zoo to be studied. This is incredibly similar to a plot point in Kurt Vonnegut’s Slaughterhouse-Five. I think it must be coincidence, given that the show was made in 1966 but never aired until the 80s, and the book was published in 1969. I can’t help but think there must be some message there that I simply don’t get because I wasn’t around in that time.

#1 Star Trek The Original Series: “Where No Man Has Gone Before” – Here we have the pilot that truly started it all, featuring James T. Kirk and all the other characters we’ve come to know and love. The crew looks for a lost ship and finds its ejected recordings, which could speak to the large number of plane crashes that were happening at the time. There’s also a scene where Dr. Dehner comments, “Women professionals do tend to overcompensate.” This is obviously a statement about feminism. The family-friendly format of the show launched it into a franchise that would become absolutely massive, so I think this definitely deserves a #1 spot.

What do you think about Star Trek’s social commentary? Which series or pilot is your favorite? I want to know!

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Ashley O’Melia is an independent author and freelancer from Southern Illinois.  She holds her Bachelor’s Degree in Creative Writing and English from Southern New Hampshire University.  Her books include The Wanderer’s Guide to Dragon Keepingand The Graveside Detective.  Her short stories have been published in The Penmen Review, Siren’s Call, and Subcutaneous.  Ashley’s freelance work has spanned numerous genres for clients around the world.  You can find her on Facebook and Amazon.

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Starlog 2: Star Trek and Network Television

For the second part of my Star Trek course, I’ve been asked the question: To what extent did the business model of network television enable Star Trek: The Original Series to appeal to such a wide range of audiences? In ways did that same model constrain it?

It’s an interesting question, and certainly not one that I’ve thought of before. I’d recently heard the stories about Lucille Ball at Desilu Productions sticking her neck out to make the show happen. I grew up in the era of The Next Generation, and I just thought Star Trek had always been popular and successful!

I think Star Trek was fortunate to get it’s start on network television, where it was forced to be family-friendly and appeal to a wide audience. It couldn’t be too sexy, too smart, too adult, too childlike, or too much of anything else. It only makes sense that this is part of what has kept it going on for so many years. Those who remember it fondly from their childhood aren’t disappointed when they return to it in their adult years.

That network-imposed need for a broad sense of appeal is exactly what made TOS what we came to know it as. The original pilot, “The Cage,” featured Captain Pike instead of Captain James T. Kirk. It was essentially dubbed as too intellectual, and a new pilot was ordered. Even though it seems odd to deem a show as too smart to appeal to audiences, that decision could very well be the make-or-break point for TOS. If the network hadn’t dismissed “The Cage,” would we still even be talking about Star Trek?

On the other hand, the network may have constrained it from doing anything that might exclude a part of their target demographic. An example of this could be the direction that Star Trek: Discovery has taken considering that it’s only broadcast on a streaming platform. The episodes in the first season are rated either TV-14 or TV-MA depending on which one you watch. To me, this means that they had a chance not only to continue the Star Trek legacy but also to take it in a direction they’d never gone before and perhaps appeal to an entirely new audience.

Even within Star Trek itself, new worlds are still being explored.

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Ashley O’Melia is an independent author and freelancer from Southern Illinois.  She holds her Bachelor’s Degree in Creative Writing and English from Southern New Hampshire University.  Her books include The Wanderer’s Guide to Dragon Keepingand The Graveside Detective.  Her short stories have been published in The Penmen Review, Siren’s Call, and Subcutaneous.  Ashley’s freelance work has spanned numerous genres for clients around the world.  You can find her on Facebook and Amazon.

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Starlog: My New Star Trek Journey

How do you know you’re a geek? A fan? A trekkie?

I always knew, but now I really know. I’ve officially enrolled in a course about Star Trek. If you don’t think that could possibly be a thing, check out this screenshot.

Edx.org is an amazing service that offers numerous online classes for free. You can get an official certificate (and most of these are from pretty prestigious places) for a small fee. I’m a sucker for credentials, certificates, and learning!

I started with a course called PredictionX: Omens, Oracles, and Prophecies. I do a lot of fantasy writing, and I thought this could be some great inspiration and information. It was absolutely incredible, and it really opened my eyes to some things I hadn’t thought about before.

I knew even before I finished PredictionX that I would have to check out the Star Trek course. I’ve loved Star Trek ever since I was a kid, and I’ve enjoyed going back and rewatching the episodes as an adult. This course, however, isn’t just about being a fan. It’s all about the cultural impact and how Star Trek has influenced people’s lives and the future. I can’t wait to dive in all the way!

For now, since I’ve gone through my orientation, I’ve officially been promoted to Cheif Warrant Officer. You can see my virtual (but still very official) insignia below. (Seriously, this is the best thing for a geek!)

How about you? Are you a trekkie? Are you taking any online classes just for fun? Let me know!

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